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Country Focus: Hungary

The Hungarian Film Week is reborn

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The Hungarian Film Week is reborn

- Today sees the start of the 42nd edition of the Hungarian Film Week, which is officially rising from the ashes following a three-year hiatus. The programme of the event – organised at the Cinema City MOM Park in Budapest until 19 October – boasts a total of 332 works (documentaries, animations, TV films, shorts and so on), including 26 fiction features.

One of the most prominent titles is No Man’s Island by Ferenc Török, which will be having its world premiere. Produced by Film Street and starring Juli Jakab, Tamas Mohai and Eszter Banfalvy, the fifth feature by the director of Moscow Square and Overnight [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
recounts the misadventures of three young people in search of happiness: a taxi driver who has been saving up to buy a house on an island in the Pacific, a talented basketball player who lacks self-confidence and a bride on the run.

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The programme also boasts the premieres of Butterflies by Gábor N Forgács, the Serbian-Hungarian co-production Strange Forest by Szabolcs Tolnai, and the German-Hungarian film Homeland, Sex and Further Inconveniences by Réka Kincses.

Further titles on the line-up include the Cannes award winner White God [+see also:
film review
trailer
film focus
interview: Kornél Mundruczó
film profile
]
by Kornél Mundruczó (read the review and watch the video interview), Free Entry [+see also:
film review
trailer
film focus
interview: Yvonne Kerékgyártó
film profile
]
by Yvonne Kerékgyártó (which won the Cineuropa Prize at Novi Sad - read the review and watch the interview) and three movies revealed at Karlovy Vary: the overall winner of the festival, Free Fall [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]
by György Pálfi (read the news); and the promising feature debuts Afterlife [+see also:
film review
trailer
making of
interview: Virág Zomborácz
film profile
]
by Virág Zomborácz (read the review) and For Some Inexplicable Reason [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]
by Gábor Reisz (read the review – set to be released in Hungary on 30 October).

Organised by the Hungarian National Film Fund (managed by Agnes Havas), the Film Week will get under way with the screening of a restored version of The Undesirable, a film directed in 1914 by a certain Mr Mihály Kertész (who would later rise to fame under the name Michael Curtiz).

Click here to see the full programme.

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