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CANNES 2017 Market / France

European horizons for Wide Management

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- The Parisian company will most notably unveil titles from Romania, Poland, Finland, Lithuania and Kosovo at the Film Market

European horizons for Wide Management
The Marriage by Blerta Zeqiri

Loyal to its editorial line, exploring all the countries in Europe, Wide Management, the Parisian international sales company run by Loïc Magneron, will be attending the Film Market of the 70th Cannes Film Festival (being held from 17 to 28 May 2017) with a vast line-up. It notably includes The Father, the latest project by Bulgarian duo Kristina Grozeva - Petar Valchanov (who rose to prominence at Toronto, won the New Directors section at San Sebastián in 2014 with The Lesson [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Kristina Grozeva, Petar Val…
interview: Margita Gosheva
film profile
]
, and were acclaimed last year in competition at Locarno with Glory [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Petar Valchanov
interview: Petar Valchanov, Kristina G…
film profile
]
). In what will be their third feature film, the two filmmakers decided to explore the subject of the many levels of communication problems and the vicious circles that follow, through a story which starts with a funeral and centres around a somewhat eccentric father and his son who tries to reason with him. The film is being produced by Bulgarian company Abraxas Film with Greek company Graal Films, Italian company Dorje Film, and the platform Eye on Films.

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Invitation-only screenings will be held for five titles that were recently added to the line-up. Among them are Pororoca [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Constantin Popescu
film profile
]
by Romanian director Constantin Popescu (see article) which centres around a happy couple, one of whose very young children disappears. Also being shown to buyers is Once Upon A Time In November [+see also:
trailer
interview: Andrzej Jakimowski
film profile
]
by Polish director Andrzej Jakimowski, which takes place in Warsaw in November 2013 and revolves around a son and his mother who are suddenly made homeless and find themselves on the streets in a society in which extremist nationalism is developing at top speed.

There will also be a private screening of Kosovan production The Marriage by Blerta Zeqiri, the story of which begins two weeks before the marriage of a couple where one of them will be visited by a blast from the past, bringing lots of complications with it.

Distributors and festival programmers will also be able to see Miracle [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Eglė Vertelytė
film profile
]
by Egle Vertelyte, a Lithuanian-Bulgarian co-production which recounts the misfortunes of a couple who run a struggling State farm, when a charming American arrives to save the company, but is perhaps not without ulterior motives...

Last but not least, there will be a private screening of Finnish feature Euthanizer by Teemu Kikki, which revolves around the fight of two men over a dog whose owner wants to have it put down.

Among the films that will be shown in "official" screenings at the market are black comedy Me and el Che by Patrice Gautier, starring Patrick Chesnais as an aging college professor who claims to have been by the side of Che Guevara in Bolivia in 1967. But the line-up also includes Albanian-Greek co-production Daybreak by Gentian Koçi, British drama Romans by Ludwig and Paul Shalmmasian, Waterboy by Dutch filmmaker Robert Jan Westdijk, Serbian film The Samurai in autumn [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
by Danilo Beckovic, and Secret Ingredient [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Gjorce Stavreski
film profile
]
by Gjorce Stavreski (a production bringing together Macedonia and Greece). 

Last but not least, worth mentioning is the project Negativ Numbers by Georgian director Ute Beria, which plunges us into a detention centre for young delinquents in Tbilissi where two former professional rugby players try to give the inmates a taste of the outside world through the sport, while the atmosphere inside the establishment is explosive.

(Translated from French)

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