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French cinema bids adieu to Girardot

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French cinema bids adieu to Girardot

Annie Girardot died today in Paris at the age of 79. Her death marked the end of an emblematic figure of French cinema of the past 50 years. The actress, who rose to fame in Luchino Visconti’s Rocco and His Brothers in 1960, was a major star in the 1960s and 1970s. She then disappeared for a period from the limelight, before returning to centre stage, notably winning the Best Supporting Actress César in 1996 for Claude Lelouch’s Les Misérables and in 2002 for Michael Haneke’s The Piano Teacher.

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Born in Paris on October 25, 1931, Girardot appeared in over 110 feature films between 1955 and 2007. Highlights of her filmography include Marco Ferreri’s The Ape Woman (1964) and Dillinger Is Dead (1969); Jean-Louis Bertucelli’s Docteur Françoise Gailland for which she won the Best Actress César in 1977; Marcel Carné’s Three Rooms In Manhattan, which earned her the Volpi Cup for Best Actress at the Venice Mostra in 1965; and Luigi Comencini’s Traffic Jam (in competition at Cannes in 1979).

Among Girardot’s other honours are a David di Donatello Award for Best Foreign Actress in 1977 and a BAFTA nomination in the same category in 1962. The actress worked with directors including Alexandre Astruc, Roger Vadim, Jean Delannoy, André Cayatte, Michel Audiard, Philippe de Broca, Bertrand Blier and especially Lelouch (Les Misérables, Going and Coming Back, Life Love Death, There Were Days… and Moons).

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(Translated from French)

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