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ADMISSIONS Sweden

Millennium days are over but admissions were up, local market share 19.8% in 2011

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Millennium days are over but admissions were up, local market share 19.8% in 2011

Last year Swedish cinema admissions totalled 16.4 million, with Swedish productions controlling 19.8% of the market. While attendance was 3.7% up on 2010, domestic market share was slightly down (from 20.8%); but the Millennium days are over, when in 2009 local films accounted for 32.7% of the 17.3 million audiences.

Five Swedish films sold more than 250,000 tickets, including Kjell Sundvall’s The Hunters 2 (536,614), Colin Nutley’s House of Angels – Third Time Lucky (496,268), Lena Koppel’s The Importance of Tying Your Own Shoes [+see also:
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(pictured) (375,090) – which were all on the list of Top Ten Films – adding Pernilla August’s Beyond [+see also:
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film profile
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and Fredrik Boklund’s Åsa-Nissa – Welcome to Knohult. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 [+see also:
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film profile
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was this year’s chartbuster, by 869,490 admissions.

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Swedish major Svensk Filmindustri AB (SF Film) was 2011’s leading distributor, accounting for 19% of the attendance, against Walt Disney and Warner Bros (Twentieth Century Fox), each with 13%. SF Bio is the country’s largest cinema chain – its 230 screens collected 65% of total attendance. By the end of last year, 266 of Sweden’s 829 screens were 2K-digitised; 25% of all cinema tickets were sold for 3D screenings.

According to the statistics published Wednesday (February 1) by the Swedish Film Institute, the efforts to achieve equality between men and women film-makers are progressing. 30% of the new features launched in 2011 had a woman director, 38% a woman script-writer, and 28% a woman producer. Among the productions subsidised by the institute, the women’s share was 41% for directors, 51% for scriptwriters and 28% for producers.

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