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PRODUCTION Sweden

We Are Best! receives better part of Swedish Film Institute funding

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- Swedish director Lukas Moodysson's new feature is among six productions - half of them documentaries - that will benefit from the latest €2.5 million round of support

We Are Best! receives better part of Swedish Film Institute funding

Currently shooting at Swedish regional film centre Film i Väst in Trollhättan, Swedish director Lukas Moodysson's Vi är bäst! (We Are Best!) (preliminary title) took more than the lion's share of the Swedish Film Institute's latest €2.5 million round of production support: €1.3 million went to the depiction of three 12-13-year-old neglected girls roaming the streets of Stockholm, produced by Lars Jönsson for Memfis Film.

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Swedish director Jens Östberg's feature debut, Blowfly Park, follows a day-nursery teacher who may have committed a violent murder. The psychological thriller, also written by Östberg and which will be produced by Rebecka Lafrenz and Mimmi Spång for Garagefilm International AB, was granted €670,000. It reunites the producers' team, who previously staged Babak Najafi's Sebbe [+see also:
film review
trailer
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(2010) and Mårten Klingberg's Cockpit [+see also:
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]
(2012).

UK director Duane Hopkins' Bypass, produced by the UK's Third Films Ltd, with Swedish producer Erik Hemmendorff's Plattform Produktion, received €58,000. Hopkins' own script portrays Tim, a young man from the lower classes - he is ill, but does not understand how ill, and he grives the recent loss of his mother; he is also a small-time fence, he will soon be a dad, and he cares for those close to him and is aware of his responsibilities.

The institute also subsidised three feature-length documentaries: Carl Javér's Freak Out!, about five youngsters who in 1900 bought a hill in Switzerland to create a new and different society, Monte Verità; Nima Sarvestani and Maryam Ebrahimi's No Burgas Behind Bars, shot in an Afghan prison for women locked up for 'moral crimes'; and Johanna St Michael's Penthouse North, about a woman who lives in the shadow of her glamorous past.

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