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RELEASES France

A Pact: a play on manipulation for Denis Dercourt

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- The French filmmaker signs a German film distributed by Jour2Fête. Also in theatres Philomena and Yves Saint Laurent

A Pact: a play on manipulation for Denis Dercourt

Living in Berlin since 2010, French director Denis Dercourt pursues in Germany a trajectory outside of the boundaries of French cinema, which has not kept him from being selected twice for the Certain Regard in Cannes (The Page Turner [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Denis Dercourt
interview: Michel Saint-Jean
film profile
]
 in 2006 and Tomorrow at Dawn [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Denis Dercourt
film profile
]
 in 2009). He now returns with A Pact [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, a delegate production by German outfit Busse & Halberschmidt, coproduced by Parisian companies Mact Productions and Cité Films, and launched today in French theatres on 15 screens by Jour2Fête.

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Filmed entirely in Germany and in German with Mark WaschkeMarie BäumerSylvester Groth et Sophie Rois in the cast, this “real-fake” thriller plays with recent history and the favourite themes of German tales: fear, guilt, devils and destiny... Starting at the beginning of the 80’s with a pact between two young “friends” in East Germany, the screenplay (written by Denis Dercourt) quickly moves on to our time with a manipulative game based on reflections between past and present, reality and fantasy, truth and lies... The story sometimes flirts with the limits of credibility in a strange atmosphere emphasized by the expressionist acting of the actors and highlighted by the musical art of the director (who is also a viola professor in a music school): “the story progresses according to the rules of rhythm, where a tense moment is resolved in a relaxed one, itself followed by an element of tension which will bring on the next episode, etc... To this is added the constant search for a counterpoint, which enables the emergence of storylines that were nearly forgotten, and which return unexpectedly.”

Also on screens this Wednesday, Yves Saint Laurent [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Jalil Lespert
film profile
]
 by Jalil Lespert (which will open the Panorama section of the next Berlinale - SND), The Sinkholes [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
 by Antoine Barraud (discovered in 2012 in Locarno in the Filmmakers of the Present section, with Mathieu Amalric, Natalie Boutefeu and Marta Hoskins in the cast - Independencia Distribution), the Franco-Portuguese co-production Cadences obstinées [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
 by Fanny Ardant (interview - Alfama Films) and the documentary A ciel ouvert by Marina Otero (Happiness Distribution).

As for non-national European cinema, Philomena [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Stephen Frears
film profile
]
 by British director Stephen Frears (Best Screenplay in Venice and nominated for the Golden Globes in the Best Drama, Best Actress and Best Screenplay categories - distribution Pathé) stands out, as well as Witching & Bitching [+see also:
trailer
interview: Alex de la Iglesia
film profile
]
 by Spanish director Alex de la Iglesia (interview - Rezo Films).

(Translated from French)

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