email print share on facebook share on twitter share on google+

FUNDING Sweden

The Swedish Film Institute backs Roy Andersson’s About Endlessness

by 

- €4.3 million in production support will go to Andersson’s film, Helena Bergström’s What a Fucking Circus, Mia Engberg’s Lucky, documentaries and shorts

The Swedish Film Institute backs Roy Andersson’s About Endlessness
A piece of concept art for About Endlessness (© Roy Andersson Filmproduktion-Studio 24)

Swedish director Roy Andersson, whose A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Roy Andersson
film profile
]
(2014) concluded his “living” trilogy and won the Golden Lion at the Venice International Film Festival, was backed by a top amount of €1.3 million for his new feature, About Endlessness, when the Swedish Film Institute announced its latest support package for new Swedish cinema.

(The article continues below - Commercial information)

Produced by Pernilla Sandström for Roy Andersson Filmproduktion-Studio 24, with Norway’s , Germany’s Essential Filmproduktion and France’s Société Parisienne de Production, and starring Magnus Wallgren, Kristina Ekmark, Lisa Blohm and Martin Serner, the film "reminds us how fragile and beautiful our existence is, and with that in mind, we should safeguard this infinite treasure and pass it on" (see the news).

After her 2015 local hit A Holy Mess [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, Swedish actress-turned-director Helena Bergström is instigating a change in scenery for her next feature, What a Fucking Circus (the direct translation of the local title), which was granted a €0.7 million subsidy (see the news).

Currently shooting in Sweden, Norwegian director Iram Haq’s What Will People Say [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Iram Haq
film profile
]
– co-produced by Zentropa Sweden’s Lizette Jonjic and Madeleine Ekman – was backed to the tune of €74,000.

Swedish director Mia Engberg switches from documentary (2013’s Belleville Baby [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
) to fiction in Lucky, also written by her, which is about ageing gangster Vincent, who is fed up of working late nights, and who dreams of another life. It eventually starts to change when he must unexpectedly assume responsibility for his teenage daughter, Grace. Set in Paris, the Story AB production by Tobias Janson received €0.6 million from the institute.

Finally, the support package also included a line-up of documentaries, including Karin Ekberg’s After Inez, Margreth Olin’s Childhood, Andreas Dalsgaard’s The Great Game [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, Sophie Vukovic’s Shapeshifters, Gunilla Bresky’s Son of the Sun, Maya Khoury’s To See the Revolution and Caroline Troedson’s Untitled. The list is topped off by 18 short-film productions, and in total, the Swedish Film Institute earmarked €4.3 million for the making of new movies.

Did you enjoy reading this article? Please subscribe to our newsletter to receive more stories like this directly in your inbox.