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RELEASES Belgium

Nowhere Man hits screens

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Nowhere Man hits screens

After the release of Taylar Barman’s 9mm [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
last week, Ursula Meier’s Home [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Kacey Mottet Klein
interview: Thierry Spicher
interview: Ursula Meier
film profile
]
the previous week, and ahead of next week’s launch of Philippe Blasband’s Coquelicots (“Poppies”), another Belgian film – Nowhere Man [+see also:
film review
film profile
]
– hits screens today.

Ten years after her debut film Rosie, Flemish director Patrice Toye returns with a work that was presented at Venice Days and the Montreal World Film Festival in August.

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Nowhere Man explores the fantasy-turned-nightmare of Tomas – an existentially anxious man in his forties – who tries to overcome his daily routine by planning a new life in an exotic location. Confronted with the bitter failure of a dream that doesn’t live up to reality, he returns home, exhausted, and has to face the social and emotional mess he left behind.

Released by Kinepolis on nine screens in Flanders and Brussels, the film was produced by La Parti Production and co-produced by Roma Films (Belgium), Circe Films (Holland), Friland (Norway) and Tarantula (Luxembourg). The title received backing from the VAF, CCA, Nordisk Film Fund and Netherlands Film Fund.

Other European releases include two UK films. Julien Jarrold’s Brideshead Revisited [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
is an adaptation of Evelyn Waugh’s 1945 masterpiece. This is the first time the English literary classic has been brought the big screen, even though the BBC series inspired by the book enjoyed immense success in the 1980s.

Meanwhile, John Maybury’s The Edge of Love [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
centres on another legendary literary figure: Welsh poet Dylan Thomas. The film features young UK film stars Sienna Miller and Keira Knightley (who seems to have a passion for period dramas).

Finally, two French films will attempt to win over audiences: Diane Bertrand’s Baby Blues [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
, which screened at the latest Namur Film Festival; and Jean-Michel Ribes’ Musée haut, Musée bas [+see also:
trailer
film profile
]
(“Museum High, Museum Low”), adapted from the eponymous stage hit by the celebrated writer of Palace.

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(Translated from French)

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