email print share on Facebook share on Twitter share on LinkedIn share on reddit pin on Pinterest

GOEAST 2024

Le 24e goEast Film Festival s'ouvre sur la projection de Crossing

par 

- La section compétition, la pièce maîtresse du festival, réunit 16 longs-métrages, fictions et documentaires, qui balaient un vaste éventail de genres et de thèmes

Le 24e goEast Film Festival s'ouvre sur la projection de Crossing
Crossing de Levan Akin

Cet article est disponible en anglais.

The 24th edition of goEast – Festival of Central and Eastern European Film (24-30 April) kicks off today at the Caligari movie theatre in Wiesbaden, Germany, with Levan Akin’s gentle transgender drama Crossing [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
interview : Levan Akin
fiche film
]
, which also opened the Panorama section of the latest Berlinale. Prizes totalling €21,500 await the winning films, including the coveted Golden Lily for Best Film, the Award for Best Director and the CEEOL Award for Best Documentary Film.

(L'article continue plus bas - Inf. publicitaire)
sunnysideofthedoc_register_2024_innerMai

A distinguished jury will apply its professional expertise in order to single out the best among the contenders. It consists of Trieste Film Festival artistic director Nicoletta Romeo; Romanian actress Ilinca Manolache, who stood out with her performance in Radu Jude’s latest effort, Do Not Expect Too Much From the End of the World [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
interview : Radu Jude
fiche film
]
); acclaimed Czech film producer Jiří Konečný; Kosovar director, curator, activist and performer Hamze Bytyçi, who serves as the artistic director of the AKE DIKHEA? international festival for Romani cinema in Berlin; and Polish journalist, producer and filmmaker Maciek Hamela, whose latest documentary In the Rearview [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
fiche film
]
will be screened at the festival.

Delving into the pressing conflicts of our time – from armed confrontations to family struggles – the films in the competition propose a glimpse into the varied landscapes of Central and Eastern Europe. Notable entries include Luka Beradze's darkly humorous political satire Smiling Georgia [+lire aussi :
critique
interview : Luka Beradze
fiche film
]
and Mokalake Tsmindani’s mystery-drama Citizen Saint [+lire aussi :
critique
interview : Tinatin Kajrishvili
fiche film
]
, both from Georgia and both premiered at last year’s Karlovy Vary International Film Festival; Olga Chernykh's multi-generational essayistic portrait of the Ukrainian war A Picture to Remember [+lire aussi :
critique
fiche film
]
; Mladen Djordjević’s social horror-drama Working Class Goes to Hell [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
interview : Mladen Djordjević
fiche film
]
, which celebrated its world premiere at Toronto; and the latest IDFA winner, the intimate family documentary 1489 [+lire aussi :
critique
interview : Shoghakat Vardanyan
fiche film
]
by Shoghakat Vardanyan, for which she draws on the tragic disappearance of her brother in the Second Nagorno-Karabakh War in 2020.

Besides placing a special focus on Central Asia, Dmitrii Davydov's Siberian drama Plague and Askhat Kuchinchirekov's tale about the end of childhood Bauryna Salu [+lire aussi :
critique
fiche film
]
, together with Maryna Vroda's pastoral drama Stepne [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
fiche film
]
and Dávid Mikulán and Bálint Révész's coming-of-age documentary KIX [+lire aussi :
critique
fiche film
]
, unfurl compelling narratives set against the backdrop of post-Soviet society. Aizhana Kassymbek's feminist drama Madina and Kumjana Novakova's poignant documentary Silence of Reason [+lire aussi :
critique
fiche film
]
deal with themes of female trauma and resilience, while Gergö Somogyvári's observational documentary Fairy Garden [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
fiche film
]
sheds light on the struggles of a trans woman in Hungary. Ivan Tymchenko's magical-realist biopic Oxygen Station [+lire aussi :
critique
interview : Ivan Tymchenko
fiche film
]
and Nicole Philmon's documentary on the celebration of Victory Day in Russia, 09.05.2022, provide unique perspectives on historical and contemporary events, while Andrei Cohn's theatrical tragedy Holy Week [+lire aussi :
critique
bande-annonce
interview : Andrei Cohn
fiche film
]
explores anti-Semitism in 19th-century, rural Romania. Finally, Andrei Kashperski's satirical mini-series Processes [+lire aussi :
critique
fiche film
]
uses biting humour to comment on recent Belarusian history and the Russo-Ukraine War.

A large delegation from Kosovo and Albania, including filmmakers Antoneta Kastrati and Gentian Koçi, will present their Albanian-language works that have shaped the region's cultural identity and will take part in the Kosovo-Albania Special Focus, curated by filmmaker Blerta Zeqiri. As for the annual Symposium, this year it is titled “The Other Queers – Cinematic Images from the Periphery of Europe” and is dedicated to the various cultural backgrounds from the “imaginary East”.

(L'article continue plus bas - Inf. publicitaire)

(Traduit de l'anglais)

Vous avez aimé cet article ? Abonnez-vous à notre newsletter et recevez plus d'articles comme celui-ci, directement dans votre boîte mail.

Privacy Policy